Last edited by Kazrakasa
Tuesday, December 1, 2020 | History

2 edition of A Treaty with the Shawanese and Delaware Indians, living on and near the Susquehanna River. found in the catalog.

A Treaty with the Shawanese and Delaware Indians, living on and near the Susquehanna River.

A Treaty with the Shawanese and Delaware Indians, living on and near the Susquehanna River.

Negotiated at Fort-Johnson, in the county of Albany, in the province of New-York, by the Honourable Sir William Johnson, Baronet, His Majesty"s sole agent, and superintendant of the affairs of the Six Confederate Nations of Indians, their allies and dependents. : (Published from the original records,) by order of His Excellency the Right Honourable John Earl of Loudoun, commander in chief of all His Majesty"s forces in North-America, &c. &c. : With a preface explaining the rise and progress of the said treaty.

by

  • 27 Want to read
  • 1 Currently reading

Published by Printed and sold by J. Parker and W. Weyman, at the new-printing-office in Beaver-Street. in New-York .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Indians of North America -- Treaties.,
  • Shawnee Indians -- Treaties.,
  • Delaware Indians -- Treaties.

  • Edition Notes

    SeriesEarly American imprints -- no. 40888., Early American imprints -- no. 41752.
    ContributionsJohnson, William, Sir, 1715-1774., Great Britain., Six Nations.
    The Physical Object
    FormatMicroform
    Paginationiv, 5-10 p.
    Number of Pages10
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL14614812M

    Susquehanna River a Crossing for Indians, Europeans Native Americans occupied what is now Harrisburg as early as 5, years ago. The first European contact with Native Americans in Pennsylvania was made by the Englishman, Captain John Smith, who journeyed from Virginia up the Susquehanna River in and visited with the Susquehanna tribe. A stalled frontal system caused tropical moisture to be funneled northward into New York, causing severe flooding in the Mohawk, Delaware, and Susquehanna River basins during June , Rainfall totals for this multi-day event ranged from 2 to 3 inches to greater than 13 inches in southern New York. The storm and flooding claimed four lives in New York, destroyed or damaged thousands of. The Gazette, 14 October, celebrated Pennsylvania's peaceful Indian policy. At Conrad Weiser's home, 25 October, the chiefs also sold land along the Delaware River below the Kittatinny Hills, and a group of four chiefs warned the Proprietors that the Delaware Indians .


Share this book
You might also like
Hells & benefits

Hells & benefits

The picture of New-York, or, The travellers guide, through the commercial metropolis of the United States

The picture of New-York, or, The travellers guide, through the commercial metropolis of the United States

The Ward Co ND Activity Book

The Ward Co ND Activity Book

When in Greece.

When in Greece.

Facing technology - the future of work

Facing technology - the future of work

Proceedings of the Bench and bar of the Circuit court of the United States, District of Maine, September 28, 1878

Proceedings of the Bench and bar of the Circuit court of the United States, District of Maine, September 28, 1878

Cassells world pictorial gazetteer

Cassells world pictorial gazetteer

Bibliography, practical, enumerative, historical

Bibliography, practical, enumerative, historical

The influence of oil contamination on the nucleate pool-boiling behavior of R-114 from a structured surface

The influence of oil contamination on the nucleate pool-boiling behavior of R-114 from a structured surface

New Jersey Coastal Heritage Trail

New Jersey Coastal Heritage Trail

Leicester, a tragedy

Leicester, a tragedy

St.Andrews Hospital

St.Andrews Hospital

A Treaty with the Shawanese and Delaware Indians, living on and near the Susquehanna River. Download PDF EPUB FB2

A Treaty with the Shawanese and Delaware Indians, living on and near the Susquehanna River: Negotiated at Fort-Johnson, in the county of Albany, in the province of New-York, by the Honourable Sir William Johnson, Baronet, His Majesty's sole agent, and superintendant of the affairs of the Six Confederate Nations of Indians, their allies and dependents.

A Treaty with the Shawanese and Delaware Indians, living on and near the Susquehanna River.: Negotiated at Fort-Johnson, in the county of Albany, in the province of New-York, by the Honourable Sir William Johnson, Baronet, His Majesty's sole agent, and superintendant of the affairs of the Six Confederate Nations of Indians, their allies and dependents.

American Indians of the Susquehanna River Area By Elaine Wintjen Researchers have found much evidence of Native Americans in the central PA area, including an exciting new discovery of a tool that might shed new light on trade and settlement in this area File Size: KB.

Proceedings and treaty with the Shawanese, Nanticokes, and Mohikander Indians, living at Otsingingo, on one of the west branches of the Susquehanna River. Negotiated at Fort-Johnson, in the C[ou]nty of Albany, in the province of New-York; by the Honourable Sir William Johnson, Bart.

Capt. Ketchum’s Delaware Village was located below the trading post on the James. John Sarcoxie, for whom the Jasper County town was later named, was a Delaware living near Delaware Town. Col. Menard of Menard and Valle came infrequently to the trading. The Susquehanna River (/ ˌ s ʌ s k w ə ˈ h æ n ə /; Lenape: Siskëwahane) is a major river located in the northeastern and mid-Atlantic United miles ( km) long, it is the longest river on the East Coast of the United drains into the Chesapeake Bay.

With its watershed, it is the 16th-largest river in the United States, and the longest river in the early 21st Mouth: Chesapeake Bay. A Treaty with the Shawanese and Delaware Indians, living on and near the Susquehanna River. Negotiated at Fort-Johnson, in the county of Albany, in the province of New-York, by the Honourable Sir William Johnson, Baronet, His Majesty's sole agent, and superintendant of the affairs of the Six Confederate Nations of Indians, their allies and.

Susquehannock people, also called the Conestoga by the English, were Iroquoian-speaking Native Americans who lived in areas adjacent to the Susquehanna River and its tributaries ranging from its upper reaches in the southern part of what is now New York (near the lands of the Five Nations of the Iroquois Confederacy), through eastern and A Treaty with the Shawanese and Delaware Indians Pennsylvania West of the Poconos and the upper.

The Proceedings and Treaty with The Shawanese and Delaware Indians living on and near The Susquehanna River.

Negotiated at Fort Johnson in the County of Albany in The Province of New York By The Honble. Sir William Johnson Baronet, His Majestys sole Superintendent of the Affairs of the Six Confederate Nations of Indians, their Allies and File Size: 98KB.

The term must also be distinguished from the “Susquehanna Indians” of the period of the “the French and Indian War,” when it denoted those living upon the upper branches of the river, without regard to tribe, but mostly Delawares and Shawanese in contradistinction to those of the same tribes who had removed to A Treaty with the Shawanese and Delaware Indians Ohio, and who, with.

of the West Branch Susquehanna River and the Susquehanna River’s main stem at Northumberland Borough, Northumberland County, upstream through Northumberland, Union, Lycoming and Clinton Counties to Lick Run near Farrandsville, Clinton County (Figure I-1).File Size: 1MB.

Wording in the treaty showed that it was signed “at the river of Severne in the province of Maryland” (Riley ). The terms of the treaty allowed the colonists to settle lands on the eastern shore without fear of Indian reprisals.

In return, the Susquehannocks received weapons with which they temporarily fought off the Iroquois. Native Americans in the Susquehanna River Valley, Past and Present differs from earlier published works about the Native Americans of Pennsylvania. It is about projectile points and petroglyphs, but it is also about family histories, the ongoing efforts to reintroduce native languages into Pennsylvania and the spiritual values many contemporary Native Americans embrace/5(7).

Causes of the alienation of the Delaware and Shawanese Indians [Charles Thomson] on *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers. Causes of the alienation of the Delaware and Shawanese Indians from the British interest This book, Causes of the alienation of the Delaware and Shawanese Indians.

The third eventually collapsed in near exhaustion. The Delaware walkers early had withdrawn in disgust, complaining bitterly that the white men did not "walk fair." The "walk" ended well into the Lehigh River Valley, near what is now the Borough of Jim Thorpe (formerly. Penn's Treaty with the Indians.

Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts. Penn Treaty Park is at N. Delaware Avenue in Philadelphia’s Fishtown section, about one-and-a-half-miles upriver from Penn’s Landing on the Delaware River.

From “Removal and the Cherokee-Delaware Agreement,” in Delaware Tribe in a Cherokee Nation, by Brice sity of Nebraska Press, Pp.The Delaware Tribe is one of many contemporary tribes that descend from the Unami- and Munsee-speaking peoples of the Delaware and Hudson River valleys.

It is estimated that during Penn’s lifetime there were betw Lenape Indians in the Delaware Valley. Their homeland included New Jersey, Delaware, southeastern Pennsylvania between the Delaware and the Susquehanna Rivers, and southeastern New York State west of the Hudson River.

This first volume in the new Stories of the Susquehanna Valley series describes the Native American presence in the Susquehanna River Valley, a key crossroads of the old Eastern Woodlands between the Great Lakes and the Chesapeake Bay in northern Appalachia.

Combining archaeology, history, cultural anthropology, and the study of contemporary Native American issues. Oklahoma Headquarters Tuxedo Blvd Bartlesville, OK Main Phone Fax Hours: Mon-Fri am pm [email protected] Kansas Headquarters High Street Caney, KS Phone The Treaty of the Lenni Lenape or Delaware Indians with William Penn on the Banks of the Delaware River in By Richard C.

Adams. When the time arrived at which William Penn and the Indians had agreed to meet personally to confirm the treaty of peace and the purchase of the land which his commissioners had bargained for and the transaction was to be publicly ratified, Penn came.

In Susquehanna, River of Dreams award-winning journalist Susan Q. Stranahan tells the sweeping story of one of America's great rivers - ranging in time from the Susquehanna's geologic origins to the modern threats to its eco-system, describing human settlements, industry and pollution, and recent efforts to save the river and its "drowned estuary," the Chesapeake Bay/5.

A Treaty with the Shawanese and Delaware Indians, living on and near the Susquehanna River: Negotiated at Fort-Johnson, in the county of Albany, in the province of New-York, by the Honourable Sir William Johnson, Baronet, His Majesty's sole agent, a.

The beliefs, customs, and traditions of those who lived near the Treaty Elm in the 18th and 19th centuries, of those who lived near the Treaty Tree, cannot be discounted.

All of this evidence led the Historical Society of Pennsylvania’s committee investigating William Penn’s Treaty, to conclude that it indeed took place and that it took.

The SSV Book series includes two volumes published inNative Americans of the Susquehanna Valley by David Minderhout of Bloomsburg University, and Coal Dust on Your Feet by Janet McGaffey of Bucknell.

Future volumes planned include Katherine Faull’s translation and study of the Moravian diaries of Shamokin, a natural history volume by a team of scientists led by Duane Griffin of.

The Lenape gradually moved west and north, and came to be called the Delaware Indians after the river along which they first lived. Local History Since the arrival of its first European settlers in the early 17th century, the Brandywine Valley played an important role in the development of the New World colonies.

37 TREATY WITH THE Shawanefe and Delaware Indians^ Living on and nedr the Sufquehanna River. NEGOTIATED At FoRt-Johnson, in the County of Albany^ i N The Province of N E W - Y O R K, By the Honourable Sir William Johnson^ Baronet, His Majefiy'i Sole Agent, and Soperintendant of the Affairs of the Sir Confederate Nations of Indians, their Allies.

One of Penn's first acts on arriving in Pennsylvania, it is said, was to make a treaty with the Delaware and Susquehannock tribes, probably at Shackamaxon, on a site now marked by a marble obelisk. Voltaire referred to this compact as 'the only treaty never sworn to, and never broken.'.

Native Americans in the Susquehanna River Valley, Past and Present, edited by David J. Minderhout, published by Bucknell University Press, - a review. This collection of articles must be reviewed as two separate books.

The first one is about Indians in the Susquehanna Valley in the past. Full text of "Names Which the Lenni Lenape or Delaware Indians, Who Once Inhabited This Country, Had Given to Rivers, Streams, Places, &c.

within the Now States of Pennsylvania, New Jersey, Maryland and Virginia: And Also Names of Chieftains and Distinguished Men of That Nation; With the Significations of Those Names, and Biographical Sketches of Some of Those Men. Traders on the Susquehanna River and on the upper Potomac River drew from the same group of men.

The first real exploration of the upper Potomac involves trade with the Natives already there. It should be noted that there was a village of the Conoy (Ganawese) Confederation on the Potomac about The Ancient Religion of the Delaware Indians and came across a land of ice and snow, until we reached the Great Fish River, or Mississippi River, where we found many people living in that valley who fiercely opposed our progress, but, after a long war, we completely overcame them, and proceeded on our journey until we finally settled in.

The Delaware (Leni Lenape) had a written history called the "Walum Olum" or "Red Score" is the migration legend of the Leni Lenape or Delaware Indians, translated by Constantine Rafinesque (), a professor at Transylvania University in Lexington, Kentucky, and published by the Indiana Historical Society.

The Susquehannock lived along the Susquehanna River and the Lenape lived along the Delaware River. Perhaps at one time they were part of the same tribe; however, by the 's there was a clear separation.

Lenni Lenape Lenape is Algonquian for The People. Lenni. Meherrin Indians were living on Roanoke River in with the southern bands of Tuscarora and Saponi, and the Machapunga.

Captain William Thomas Riddle, a reckless North Carolina Tory leader, and a Melungeon, captured two soldiers commanded by Colnel Benjamin Cleveland of the Wilkes County Militia. Massacre at Gnadenhutten. Lancaster County Indians: Annals of the Susquehannocks and Other Indian Tribes of the Susquehanna Territory from about the Year tothe Date of Their Extinction.

An Exhaustive and Interesting Series of Historical Papers Descriptive of Lancaster County's. Katie Faull, Bucknell University. In his classic account of one of the more colorful 18 th century figures on the Susquehanna River, Andrew Montour, acclaimed historian James Merrell provides the following description of the peculiarities of this place on the Pennsylvania frontier.

from the s to the s, the Susquehanna country was a debatable land, a place marked by confusion and. Susquehannock pushed down to the eastern branch of the Susquehanna River -- Susquehannock forced to ask the Mohawk for peace. Mohawk agreed in Smallpox epidemic during war wish Shawnee -- With English help, the Susquehannock were able to turn back a.

Delaware Indians is the English name for the Lenni Lenape tribe that prior to Europeans arrival lived on the lands th at are now Delaware, New Jersey, New York, and Pennsylvania. Why the tribe was named Delaware. The Delaware River flowed through their lands.

They were divided into three major groups, the Munsee, the Unalachtigo, and the Size: KB. Seventeenth-century Indians from the Delaware and lower Hudson valleys organized their lives around small-scale groupings of kin and communities.

Living through epidemics, warfare, economic change, and physical dispossession, survivors from these peoples came together in new locations, especially the eighteenth-century Susquehanna and Ohio /5.

Some information about Delaware Indians. Delaware Indians The Delaware tribe also called Lenni Lenape, or Lenape, (len-ah'-pay) which means "The People" in their language, are a confederation of Algonquian - speaking North American Indians who occupied the Atlantic seaboard from Cape Henlopen, Delaware, to western Long Island.Leaving the Potomac River in October, GIST crossed the Ohio near the confluence of the Alleghany and Monongahela.

From there he traveled to the mouth of Beaver River and then crossed the country, reaching the Tuscarawas on the 5th of December, at a point near the site of Bolivar.The word Susquehannock is Algonquin and apparently means ‘people of the muddy river,’ in reference to the Susquehanna River.

The Susquehannock people spoke a derivation of the Iroquois language, which is very similar to that spoken by the Huron tribe. The Susquehannock were a confederacy of five tribes, scattered around twenty or so villages.